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Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Visit to Limestone Caves, finding God and evolution

My previous year was dedicated to traveling, exploring and absorbing myself in this new western world of East and mid-west in United States. I also spent some time trying my hands at Canvas paintings and polymer clay crafts (that I deeply fell in love with) and will eventually share those works here.

Right at the beginning of this year I visited one of the most beautiful natural sights in Madison with my husband called 'Cave of the Mounds', which was discovered in 1939. The delightful beauty of this limestone cave illustrates nature's intricate handiwork, with many beautiful structures inside. Limestone is majorly made up of Calcium Carbonate, that came from shells of marine organisms on ancient ocean floors. Since these are water soluble, rainwater created cavities in them forming a cave. The water that formed cavities, carried calcium carbonates to other areas creating new formations inside the caves. Many of these formations and structures took millions of years to form.
My previous visit to any such limestone cave was back in India in Andaman and Nicobar Islands, though those caves did not have cavities as deep as this. And hence walking here was a richer experience for me.
Cave of the Mounds, Wisconsin
During our walk, we spotted two places with peculiar formations (specifically to Indian eyes) closely resembling Indian Gods. The first was common and often found i.e. Shiva-ling. The second one resembled Lord Ganesha. With a quiet understanding, we passed a smile at each other. Both of us knew, if it was in India, this would have been a place of religious interest.

Formation inside the cave resembling to Lord Ganesha (above)
and Shivaling (below)
On our way back home, we were discussing about such places in India where devotees go despite the journey being life threatening. And many people each year lose their lives to be at those religious places. Interestingly, many of the relatives of dead consider it to be auspicious when their known die there (since everyone will die someday), believing them to reach heaven. Perhaps it is the spirit of adventure and the hope of finding something bigger than ourselves that makes us go such great lengths.

Since these caves were formed on ancient sea-bed, the limestone here were rich in many minerals and fossils. We bought fossils of fish, which being a biologist’s wife now, is a cherished possession at our home. 
The Ammonites (spiral shaped fossil) were sea creatures that lived from 65 to 350 million years ago and are now extinct.
It is interesting to see how every creature on earth including ourselves, evolved from fishes- you may find the first episode of this documentary interesting – Your inner Fish

P.S. Wish you all a very Happy 2017 :)

26 comments:

  1. Very interesting, so cavities are formed due to water, and they tell us to stop eating chocolate (kuch to gadbad hai)

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    1. Hahahaha hahahaha! So limestone is water soluble not teeth (pulp, dentin, enamel, and cementum- none of which is Calcium Carbonate) :P

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  2. Our minds are constantly searching for patterns, when we find any we're filled with awe and connect it divine to reach a justification. Nevertheless, pilgrimage a good excuse to undertake an adventurous journey. And your soul does get nourishment from a journey. A lovely post all in all, it was very interesting to see those fossils and the documentary is really cool!

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    1. https://www.google.co.in/amp/www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4130322/amp/Stunning-ALMA-images-reveal-turtle-shaped-spot-sun.html

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    2. True. Thank you so much, I am delighted!

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  3. Ahhh. A new post after a long interval. Missed your writings. Glad you had a great time at the Limestone Caves. Since you live in California, I would suggest Mitchell Caverns and Moaning Cavern for you and your groom to visit.

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    1. Hi SG, I missed blogosphere too :)
      Actually I moved again from California last year in June to mid-west. I will put your suggested places in notes for next time I will be in Cali.

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  4. Too bad you moved out of California. You can see I am partial to California. Wish you both all the best in mid-west. Since you liked reading a couple of my posts, I thought you will be interested to read a post of mine (2 parts) about how a guy makes first impression with a girl. This is a real life incident and not a fiction. Here are the links.

    http://sg-shootthebreeze.blogspot.com/2016/12/first-impression-part-1-of-2.html

    http://sg-shootthebreeze.blogspot.com/2016/12/first-impression-part-2-of-2.html

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    1. Thankyou SG. Yes yes even I have become a little partial to California after living for merely six months.
      Thanks for sharing the links, I will read them for sure. :)

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  5. Very interesting . When time favours I would like visiting this temple :)

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  6. The beautiful stalactites and stalagmites ; nature's very own masterpiece.

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  7. The caves look fascinating... What a beauty! True, if that was in India, it would have been a major pilgrim location :) looking forward to read more on your travel and clay crafting :)

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    1. Thankyou Raj :) I will share them soon :)

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  8. Thanks for your comments in my blog. Want to answer your questions. I do not know your email address. If you drop me a line, I will reply. My email id Is rajang716 at gmail dot com

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  9. This reminds me of the Limestone caves I saw in Andaman & Nicobar last year.
    There could be some truth in the fact that all os evolved from fishes, considering that there was more water than land (which is slowly being turned over in the name of "reclamation")

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    1. Yaa Andaman was my first reaction when I heard about limestone caves first.
      Well I dont know about some truth but after watching this documentary, it seemed like whole truth. When comes religion, to me it is more for spirituality and connecting to oneself and answers to those things that are undiscovered till now. Dont you think so? :)

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  10. Oh yes, those formations do look like Ganesha and Shivling. Agree with you, had these been in India, the place would have been converted into a religious tourist place. The fish fossils are interesting and looking forward to your polymer clay crafts!

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    1. Thanks Shilpa! :)
      I will share them soon <3

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  11. Spectacular formations inside the caves! Truly nature's wonders...:)

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    1. That was our expression when we saw them. Thanks for visiting :)

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  12. Really interesting place. Whether these Pictures are taken by yourself?

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    1. Thanks Arun. Yes these photographs are taken by me. I would have mentioned it, if I had taken them from elsewhere. :)

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  13. We visited Cave of the Mounds this past weekend and like you said, the entire family was surprised to see the unmistakable formation of Ganesha and Shiva Linga in that place. And then I started searching the internet for any such mentions and I am glad I found your blog!

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Thankyou for your feedback :)

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